10 Ways to Measure Social Customer Service

What are the ten best ways of measuring social customer service. We asked three experts - and here's what they said.

measurement

What are the ten best ways of measuring social customer service? We asked three experts – and here’s what they said.

social media measurement

Ever since we decided it was a cost-centre, rather than an asset to be exploited, customer service has been awash with metrics. It is one of the most tightly measured departments in any large brand – with phone-calls timed to the second and response times scrutinised daily. Blending this with social media, where metrics are frequently absent or meaningless, is therefore not any easy task.

Never one to be daunted, I’ve asked a team of genuine social customer service pioneers to join me for an exploration of social customer service metrics. You can listen to it here. It takes place at 3pm UK time this Thurs – but if you’re reading this after the event, you can also listen again.

In the meantime, I thought I’d share our initial notes on the theme of ’10 Ways to Measure Social Customer Service’ – as there are some really useful tasters to whet your appetite, or anger you, depending on your beliefs. I’d welcome your input on this list here, or via questions during the webinar.

Measuring impact

  • Number and percentage of posts responded to – Often used as a headline to batter companies (‘only x% of Facebook questions responded to’)
  • ‘Time to answer’ (TTA)’ or ‘Time to resolution’
  • Deflection (or 1:1 contact reduction) – Offers measurement of impact on traditional channels like phone/email/forums.
  • ‘Direct contacts versus listening volume’ and ‘relevance of listened volume’
  • Thread depth – including ‘First Post Resolution’ and ‘channel redirection’
  • ‘Customer effort’ – i.e. how much hassle a customer goes through to get their issue resolved.
  • ‘Sales through social service’ and ‘prevention of returns or cart abandonment’ – Both a measure of ROI and quality of response

Measuring customer satisfaction

  • Positive/Negative sentiment – Perhaps a more effective measure of success than for other Departments, e.g. marketing
  • Net Promoter Score (NPS) – A traditional PR measurement tool to discover ‘likelihood to recommend’
  • ‘Gratitude Index’ on external channels like Twitter/Facebook – Much favoured by Jerome Pineau (I’ll ask why in the webinar)

Measuring efficiency

  • Percentage of enquiries managed per channel – An indication of the success (or opportunity) of service on each social channel
  • Average handling time – To be compared with non-social channels
  • Average conversation thread depth – Perhaps an indication of agent efficiency

Measuring culture

  • Employee engagement level – How involved are your employees in service?

We ran a webinar entitled How should Contact Centres integrate social media? on Jan 12th 2014, featuring author and advisor to major brands, Martin Hill-Wilson. Well worth a listen.

Related Posts

In this article

Join the Conversation

2 comments

  1. Jeremy Taylor Reply

    A lot of brands seem to place a lot of emphasis on response time, which I find frustrating. Anyone can send a quick response, it doesn’t mean that it actually helps the customer.

    As a customer what I really want is:

    1. For the problem to be resolved satisfactorily, with minimum effort on my part (or even better, they could do something that really exceeds my expectations).

    2. For the problem to be resolved quickly.

    3. To feel like the person on the other end understands and cares about my problem.

    Keeping costs down is always important, but when it comes to measurement I’d rather companies focus what the customer wants and expects and work backwards from there.

    1. Jennifer Spencer Reply

      I’ve always treated “response” time and “solution” time differently, but then I work primarily in financial services, where questions are usually tied to money and access to it. Responding as quickly as possible is important to let the customer know you’ve heard them, you’re sorry, and you’re working on the solution. That buys a little time to actually dig into it and find the solution. So if you’re my customer, I address your needs a little more like 3, 1, 2 than 1, 2, 3 as you list them.

99 Shares
Share6
Tweet48
+113
Share32