Burger King Twitter Hack and Social Media Security for Teams

Fast food chain Burger King have become victims of hackers, namely Anonymous, who have changed their profile name to ‘McDonalds’ and are tweeting and retweeting a string of...

Fast food chain Burger King have become victims of hackers, namely Anonymous, who have changed their profile name to ‘McDonalds’ and are tweeting and retweeting a string of messages mocking their current situation.

You will often see individuals with hacked Twitter or Facebook profiles, we are all familiar with the ‘What are you doing in this picture?’ message which is still doing the rounds, but it is very rare that a brand as big as Burger King falls victim to a hacker.

Twitter offers plenty of advice for keeping your account secure including:

  • Keeping a Strong & Unique Password
  • Evaluating Links on Twitter
  • Selecting Third Party Applications with Care
  • Keeping your Browser Up to Date

Setting security policies for social media should be something a large company, managing a team of staff using the same account, should distribute widely to all users. Knowing how social networks work, creating a great social media campaign and being engaging on social networks is often talked about far more than security. Security is arguably more important and the first thing that should be communicated to users.

Have you got a security policy for social in your team? Will you set one in up in the wake of what has happened to Burger King?

Our next webinar, Managing Social Media for Teams, is looking at the challenges of internal communications and social media. 7th March, 4-5pm GMT. Register for FREE here. 

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6 comments

  1. Richard Hughes Reply

    I know that this is very cynical of me, and I have no evidence justify it, but my first reaction to hearing the story was “it was probably a disgruntled employee”. I think that’s the legacy of incidents like the recent HMV one. I fear that both incidents put the cause of “sensible” social media back a long way, because they highlight the risks to brand reputation if the accounts are mismanaged or misappropriated. That makes it easier for management to justify not taking the risk.

    1. Luke Brynley-Jones Reply

      I agree Richard – it certainly gives the nay-sayers a stronger hand. That said, it does serve to highlight a major issue for social media accounts – that most companies (and individuals) don’t manage their security very systematically, When I ask most companies: “When did you last do a review of the 3rd party apps that have access to your Twitter account?” They usually go “Uh?”.

      1. Richard Hughes Reply

        I also wonder how many companies have any workflow in place to review tweets or Facebook posts before they go out. My guess (and you are far more likely to know the answer to this than I do) is “very few”.

        1. Luke Brynley-Jones Reply

          There are companies that offer a pre-post moderation service for financial and listed companies. I think it will be a standard feature offering in 1-2 years.

  2. Burger King Twitter Hack and Social Media Security for Teams | Our Social Times | digitalnews2000 Reply

    […] on oursocialtimes.com Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… This entry was posted in Uncategorized by […]

  3. Karen’s PR & Social Media Blog » Social Media & Crisis Communications in 2013: Reflections & Things to Note Reply

    […] in latest news about cyber security to protect reputation online: We saw this for Jeep and Burger King when they got their accounts hacked, and we have to prepare for situations where this may happen. […]

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