3 Ways to Take the ‘Boring’ out of B2B Content Marketing

Having worked with lots of B2B companies over the past year, one of the first challenges we've had to overcome is convincing them that - yes, your brand...

Having worked with lots of B2B companies over the past year, one of the first challenges we’ve had to overcome is convincing them that – yes, your brand can be fun and interesting. Here’s how…

The conversation tends to come around because, thankfully, they already understand that B2B content marketing is a big deal, they’re just not sure how it can be applied to them. Our job is to open their eyes to a new way of thinking. Here are three of the best tactics (and examples) we use:

   1.  Find an angle

We worked with a company that produces electrical connectors. Admittedly it may sound a bit dull at first, but then we found out that these particular connectors are designed to work in extreme conditions, such as underwater or in the desert. A few Google searches later we’d put together a blog post – 10 things that shouldn’t work underwater, but do. It included a video of a car that doubles up as a submarine and, pogo sticks, guns and babies. Of course, we also found room to show their connectors being used in a fish tank without all the fish being electrocuted.

This started as just a blog post – but the concept could be applied to create a fun and engaging piece of content across a range of formats, drawing an audience – of mainly techie guys (their target market) to their website .

fish-tank-connector

   2.  Be shocking

The web has a shocking photo for every occasion – and every industry. Last year, while on the hunt for some great content for a construction consultancy, I came across the ‘Idiots on Ladders’ campaign by the Ladder Association.

The campaign was all about raising awareness of ladder safety and it worked fantastically well for a simple reason – Ladders are not interesting, but people doing stupid things on ladders is really interesting. For three months they collected picture submissions in order to discover the biggest “ladder idiot” in the UK – and here he is:

idiots on ladders

The tweets and posts we published about this campaign attracted unprecedented levels of engagement to the brand and a raft of additional followers. 12 months on, our client is seen as industry-leading in its use of social media.

   3.  Be fun

At Social Media Marketing 2013, Doug Kessler showed an example that really hit home for a lot of people, presenting two similar companies, but with very different branding.

The first website told us that the company offers “an extensive range of fans based on external rotor motors, single or double inlet forward curved, single inlet backward curved motorised impellers, axial fans in a variety of configurations such as flat guard…” – you get the idea.

Then we looked at “Big Ass Fans”. The name came about after one of their customers exclaimed, “wow, that’s a big ass fan” and it stuck. Obviously, you need to figure out what’s going to appeal to your target market, but frankly, who wouldn’t buy a fan from Big Ass Fans? Kudos to the business owner for being brave enough to roll with it!

big ass fans

We specialise in B2B content marketing  and lead generation for clients that think they’re boring. If that’s you,  please get in touch for an informal chat.

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5 comments

  1. Doug Kessler Reply

    Love it. And great to see Big Ass Fans get the credit they deserve.

  2. Mark hayward Reply

    I love the ladders campaign, can’t think how I could make it work for the steel profiling industry but it’s got me thinking.

    1. Luke Brynley-Jones Reply

      Glad it’s helping get your creative juices flowing. I actually had a lady whose company manufactured steel sheeting in a class of mine recently. She started reeling off the different types of sheeting and what each one could be used for, how much weight/stress it could take and how they measured all this. It was weirdly fascinating and I’m sure it would have made compelling reading for an engineer. It’s all about finding your inner interestingness.

  3. Ben Reply

    Thanks for this article. There’s some great insight in here for sure 🙂 How do you handle objections from your more conservative clients when it comes to being “fun?”

    1. Luke Brynley-Jones Reply

      [Missed your comment Ben – sorry!] We do get that. A close second is to be interesting – and everyone wants to be interesting!