GDPR training expert joins up with compliance firm

Me Learning inks partnership with InfoSaaS to deliver GDPR training programmes to a wider audience. Is your organisation ready yet?

GDPR training


The EU’s new data protection laws – otherwise known as GDPR – are approaching at a rate of knots. They come into effect at the end of May, and if you aren’t ready now then you really need to get moving.

The EU is calling it “the most important change in data privacy regulation in 20 years”, so you’d be unwise to ignore it and assume it doesn’t apply to your organisation.

If you’re in full-on panic mode about the rapidly approaching deadline and don’t know where to start, help is at hand.

GDPR online training expert, Me Learning, has recently joined forces with InfoSaaS – a leading UK-based provider of cloud-based compliance software solutions, in a partnership that will provide organisations with an end-to-end approach to implementing GDPR compliance.

Clients of InfoSaaS will now be offered the comprehensive GDPR e-learning programmes provided by Me Learning, as part of their compliance process. While Me Learning customers will be made aware of the InfoSaaS UtopiaR GDPReady solution.

“GDPR isn’t just about data, it’s about how brands interact and communicate with the customers,” said Abeed Janmohamed, Commercial Director at InfoSaaS.

“Social media is simply another connection point. The data the various platforms generate, namely Twitter handles, Slack IDs or the data associated with LinkedIn profiles, present the same challenges that an email address does so can’t be ignored when it comes to GDPR.

“InfoSaaS provides brands with a clear path to compliance covering guidance on all areas where data and customer interact including, of course, social media.”

>> READ MORE: Social media and GDPR – is your brand ready for the change? <<

EU GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) is new data protection legislation that comes into force throughout all 28 countries of the European Union on 25 May.

It places more robust data protection obligations on organisations who process personal data, which brings existing data protection law up-to-date with today’s modern, digital age.

Organisations should be preparing to comply – not least because their valued customers will demand it, but also with one eye on the hefty penalties which may be levied for non-compliance. The prospect of a €20 million fine should be sufficient incentive for making sure that GDPR compliance is properly achieved.

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